The Science Behind Zendo and Technology Assisted Meditation

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The positive health benefits of meditation have become widely accepted as mindfulness based interventions (MBIs) grow in popularity. Unfortunately, many individuals quit their meditation practice due to the dozens of hours of practice and the steep learning curve required to experience health benefits. For these reasons we developed Zendo - a tool that accelerates meditative practice through a method known as E-Meditation.

We are committed to doing research on our method and system and actively publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. We are currently in the process of supporting a new study on the effects of e-meditation and creativity (divergent thinking) at the University of Milan in Winter 2019.

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E-Meditation Increases Calm Compared to Placebo

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E-meditation is a novel approach to a centuries old tradition of meditation for psychological well-being. The first report on this technology was published in 2017. This study tested E-Meditation versus conventional meditation with placebo stimulation. In this randomized, placebo controlled trial, E-Meditation made meditators feel 2.5X more calm compared to conventional meditation paired with placebo stimulation.

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E-Meditation Reduces Stress and Mind Wandering

26 healthy, stimulation-naïve individuals (14 female) voluntarily attended one of two group E-Meditation sessions conducted on the same day. Each group session consisted of 14 individuals who were assigned to the group based on time availability. Trained professionals instructed the group on how to setup stimulation electrodes and self-administer tDCS while they simultaneously were guided through a meditation session by a trained meditation practitioner. Findings reveal that 20 minutes of E-Meditation is a safe, novel addition to conventional contemplative practice that reduces mind wandering and perceived acute stress state.

Findings reveal a 75% reduction in stress state (mean difference (post-pre) = -4.342±0.64, P<0.001, n=26) was demonstrated. Individuals reported feeling significantly less restless and more calm as measured by VAS

Findings reveal a 75% reduction in stress state (mean difference (post-pre) = -4.342±0.64, P<0.001, n=26) was demonstrated. Individuals reported feeling significantly less restless and more calm as measured by VAS

Group E-Meditation reduced mind wandering measured using the MEWS by a mean of 36% (mean difference (post-pre): -5.607±1.09, P=0.003, n=26).

Group E-Meditation reduced mind wandering measured using the MEWS by a mean of 36% (mean difference (post-pre): -5.607±1.09, P=0.003, n=26).

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References:

1. Badran, Bashar W., et al. "A double-blind study exploring the use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to potentially enhance mindfulness meditation (E-Meditation)." Brain Stimulation: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation 10.1 (2017): 152-154.

2. Badran, Bashar W., and E. Baron Short. "Abstract# 11: tDCS-Enhanced Meditation (E-Meditation) Reduces Mind Wandering and Stress State: An Open-Label Pilot Trial." Brain Stimulation: Basic, Translational, and Clinical Research in Neuromodulation 12.2 (2019): e4.